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Find my midwife new plymouth

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Taranaki For a full list of midwives in this region and to refine your search, click here. Laura Scholey. Hannah Mana. Sadie Jury. Danette Morresey. Angela Worthington.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: What is the difference between a midwife and an OB/GYN?

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Pushed - My Experience As A New Midwife

Family History

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Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. Your first midwife appointment also called the booking appointment should happen before you're 10 weeks pregnant. This is because you'll be offered some tests that should be done before 10 weeks. If you're more than 10 weeks pregnant and haven't seen a GP or midwife, contact a GP or midwife as soon as possible. They will advise you about what to do. Find out more about pregnancy and coronavirus. The first appointment is a chance to tell your midwife if you need help or are worried about anything that might affect your pregnancy.

This could include domestic abuse or violence, sexual abuse, or female genital mutilation FGM. FGM can cause problems during labour and birth. It's important you tell your midwife or doctor if this has happened to you. They'll also offer you a blood test for sickle cell and thalassaemia blood disorders that can be passed on to the baby if they think there's a high chance you might have them.

They'll work out your chance by asking some questions. At the end of the first appointment, your midwife will give you your maternity notes in a book or a folder. These notes are a record of your health, appointments and test results in pregnancy. They also have useful phone numbers, for example your maternity unit or midwife team. You should carry these notes with you all the time until you have your baby. This is so health care staff can read about your pregnancy health if you need urgent medical care.

Page last reviewed: 10 October Next review due: 10 October Your first midwife appointment - Your pregnancy and baby guide Secondary navigation Getting pregnant Secrets to success Healthy diet Planning: things to think about Foods to avoid Alcohol Keep to a healthy weight Vitamins and supplements Exercise.

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Early days Your NHS pregnancy journey Signs and symptoms of pregnancy Health things you should know Due date calculator Your first midwife appointment.

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Being a parent Help with childcare Sign up for weekly baby and toddler emails. You'll still have your first midwife appointment and start your NHS pregnancy journey. Hospitals and clinics are making sure it's safe for pregnant women to go to appointments. Information: You should carry these notes with you all the time until you have your baby.

Taranaki maternity facilities

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Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. Your first midwife appointment also called the booking appointment should happen before you're 10 weeks pregnant. This is because you'll be offered some tests that should be done before 10 weeks.

They have the best work-life balance and of course also the sexiest accent. Hayley from Accent made everything so simple and easy - she was the beacon of knowledge for me Sure there are some differences but overall it's manageable I applied for a job through Accent and the easiest part of the process was finding a role because of the assistance provided by them

Your Midwife

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Hospital Midwife jobs

Secondary maternity facilities are designed for women and babies who experience complications and may require care from an obstetrician, anaesthetist, paediatrician as well as a midwife. Well women may use these facilities in the absence of other maternity facilities in their area. Primary maternity facilities are designed for well women who have no complications during pregnancy. There are no tertiary maternity facilities in Taranaki.

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How to access a Lead Maternity Carer

The vast majority of women in New Zealand give birth in hospitals, but there are also other options for those who don't have any complications. Here's an overview of what the options are, where they are available and what the advantages and disadvantages are. For most people this will be a midwife but it could also be a private obstetrician. She or he will see you through your whole pregnancy and will be there when you're giving birth.

Are you new to family history research? Our getting started guide will help you work out what questions you want to answer, and give you some tips to start finding your family in the Library's collections. Birth, death and marriage BDM registration records provide vital information about the dates of those events and may also tell us the names and occupations of an earlier generation. You will need a Family Name surname but be aware that sometimes there are errors of transcription or interpretation of handwriting, or a mistaken informant. Finding a precise date means that you can then go to the newspapers and find a notice usually within a day or week of the event. In some cases there may be nothing, but often it can supply invaluable information about your relatives.

Bachelor of Midwifery

If you are searching for a midwife by name please begin by entering as much of the surname as you know to be correct. Do not include a first name unless necessary and please do not include a location. Alternatively if you are searching by location, please do not include any information in the name fields. Skip to main content. How to find a midwife What to expect from your midwife in New Zealand What if you are not happy with your midwife? Useful Websites. What does it take to qualify as a midwife Types of midwifery education in New Zealand National Midwifery Examination Why are midwives regulated? What are the on-going practice requirements?

Jul 15, - The New Zealand College of Midwives has developed the following help you find a midwife in your area: kingswokaj.com  Dr Edward Williams‎: ‎[email protected]

Are you a home birth midwife in New Zealand not listed here? All the midwives listed on our site have specifically registered with us as home birth midwives. Check out our your home birth page for advice and guidance on choosing a midwife, or read about the maternity system in New Zealand here. Having a student midwife at your birth is a wonderful opportunity for them as future midwives, as well as for you and your whanau. It is great to have an extra pair of hands helping out with your birth, student midwives can do everything from supporting your midwife, to bringing a cuppa and the hot cloths.

Your Midwife Recommendations

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