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Man find creation date

In Linux every single file is associated with timestamps, and every file stores the information of last access time, last modification time and last change time. So, whenever we create new file, access or modify an existing file, the timestamps of that file automatically updated. In this article we will cover some useful practical examples of Linux touch command. Before heading up for touch command examples, please check out the following options. The following touch command creates an empty zero byte new file called sheena. By using touch command, you can also create more than one single file.

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Linux and Unix find command tutorial with examples

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Click Here to receive this Complete Guide absolutely free. I suspect I am missing something fundamental here so apologies for not RTFM'ing in the right places but I can not seem to find this one. I would like to be able to list the creation date of a file using the 'ls' command. Some of the docuentation, including the Red Hat stuff, appears to suggest that ls -la gives the creation date of a file. I have, however, done some testing using vi and the touch command and it appears that the default of "ls -l" is actually ctime or last modified time.

I would like to know how to find the creation date and time of a file using ls or, indeed, any other command. Thanks in advance any enlightning advice. Regards Rob. There are three time stamps that a files keeps track of: Code:. Last edited by moses; at AM. Find More Posts by moses. Thread Tools. BB code is On. Smilies are On. All times are GMT The time now is AM.

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Find More Posts by robt. There are three time stamps that a files keeps track of: Code: status change ls -c last modification ls last access ls -u The status change time also called change time by stat 2 is your best bet, but it is only valid if the status of the file hasn't changed since its creation.

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8 Practical Examples of Linux “Touch” Command

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The date command displays the current date and time. It can also be used to display or calculate a date in a format you specify.

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up. Note that on Linux this requires coreutils 8. The POSIX standard only defines three distinct timestamps to be stored for each file: the time of last data access, the time of last data modification, and the time the file status last changed. Modern Linux filesystems, such as ext4, Btrfs and JFS, do store the file creation time aka birth time , but use different names for the field in question crtime in ext4, otime in Btrfs and JFS.

Dating creation

Account Options Sign in. My library Help Advanced Book Search. View eBook. Indiana University Press Amazon. Kristen E. Kvam , Linda S. Schearing , Valarie H. Ziegler , Valarie H Ziegler. Indiana University Press , - Religion - pages. No other text has affected women in the western world as much as the story of "Eve and Adam".

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By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It only takes a minute to sign up. Something annoying about ls -l command is it shows only hour and minute for a file like

Dating creation is the attempt to provide an estimate of the age of Earth or the age of the universe as understood through the origin myths of various religious traditions.

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How to Use the Date Command in Linux

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. As pointed out by Max, you can't, but checking files modified or accessed is not all that hard. I wrote a tutorial about this, as late as today.

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It only takes a minute to sign up. I need to find the creation time of a file, when I read some articles about this issue, all mentioned that there is no solution like Site1 , Site2. Know the inode of the directory by ls -i command lets say for example its X. Nux found a great solution for this which you should all upvote.

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Join , subscribers and get a daily digest of news, geek trivia, and our feature articles. Assuming you have it set up right, Windows Search is pretty powerful. Or maybe you accidentally allowed a third party software installation, and want to locate those files quickly. Every file on a Windows system has one or more time stamps. There are also a number of other times stamps available in Windows that are used on certain file types, or under certain circumstances. For example, a Date Taken time stamp is recorded when images are captured with a camera. Other time stamps may be created and used by certain applications.

The latter is often referred to as the "creation time" - even in some man pages - but that's wrong; it's also set by such operations as mv, ln, chmod, chown and.

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find command in Linux with examples

The find command in UNIX is a command line utility for walking a file hierarchy. It can be used to find files and directories and perform subsequent operations on them. It supports searching by file, folder, name, creation date, modification date, owner and permissions.

How do I find out the creation time of a file?

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Comments: 1
  1. Dagal

    I can not participate now in discussion - it is very occupied. But I will return - I will necessarily write that I think on this question.

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